Signature Effects

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Many drum corps have "signature" effects that they are known for. This page details many of them, organized alphabetically by name of effect.

The Vanguard "Bottle Dance"

In 1979, SCV secretly designed a new ending for their Finals performance. In it, the guard dropped to their knees, holding hands in the air, and some of the hornline dropped to their knees. The hornline played the "Bottle Dance," from the popular musical, Fiddler on the Roof. The Bottle Dance has become a tradition within the corps. It is often played as an "In the Lot" warm up. The piece has been performed on a number of occasions, including '73, '74, '78, '82, and '90. A video of the '79 Finals Bottle Dance performance can be seen here.

The Phantom Regiment "Leg Wedge"

The Phantom Regiment uses a unique formation known as the "Leg Wedge." They form a wedge with the hornline, then, the front-most lines put their leg out. This effect was most recently seen in their 2004 production "Apasionada 874." Although the show pictured is their 2003 show Harmonic Journey. http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g84/UnionEndicottMB/DCI/130779c4.jpg

The Vanguard "Vanish"

Known for being theatrical, in 1989, when SCV performed music from Phantom of the Opera, they executed what may be the most famous effect of all time. During the finale, a baritone player dressed as the Phantom, played a short solo, then sat in a chair. Two guard members covered him with a cloth, then, as everyones attention was focused on the Phantom's chair, the entire corps hid either behind the masks lining the field or underneath a black cloth with a Phantom mask on it. When the cloth on the chair was pulled away, the Phantom had vanished, leaving only a half-mask behind. When the audience looked up, the entire corps had vanished as well.

The Cadets' "Z-Pull"

Perhaps the Cadet's most famous drill set, the Z Pull was an, at the time, innovative new type of drill. The Z-Pull pioneered the way in assymetrical drill. The name is derived from the name of the drill designer, George Zingali.

http://www.drumcorpswiki.com/images/2/2b/Z-pull.jpg